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The Economist: Retro or radical - No.27 - 4th July 20

Liên hệ

Tạp chí The Economist là tạp chí uy tín của Anh với lịch sử hơn 176 năm hình thành. The Economist nổi tiếng với văn phong hàn lâm, chuyên sâu về các vấn đề chính trị, kinh tế trên toàn thế giới. Mỗi tuần có hơn 1.7 triệu bản đến tay độc giả trên 200 quốc gia. Hiện ấn bản nhập về Việt Nam là phiên bản cho khu vực Châu Á - Thái Bình Dương.

Lợi thế của The Economist:

+Tạp chí 176 năm hình thành

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+Là tạp chí ưa thích của các doanh nhân hàng đầu thế giới như Bill Gates, Angela Merkel,.... 

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Chi tiết sản phẩm

The Economist: Retro or radical

 

Why Joe Biden’s instinctive caution makes real change possible

When the history of the Trump presidency is written, a photo-op in Lafayette Square at the beginning of June might just mark the turning-point. Since he announced his run for the White House in 2015, Donald Trump’s political method has been to maximise at all times the amount of attention directed at him. The Lafayette Square escapade offended Christians, because the president waved a Bible around like a prop. It embarrassed the country’s most senior military commander, who later apologised for joining a political show that involved the tear-gassing of peaceful protesters. More important, it did not work. Rather than being in command, Mr Trump seemed desperate. When power is based on appearances it can slip away suddenly.

Before covid-19 hit America, Mr Trump looked likelier than not to be re-elected, thanks to a relentlessly growing economy. Incumbent presidents almost always win in such circumstances. Our election model made him a narrow favourite, even though he was a few points down in national polls with his rival, Joe Biden. However, the president is now in a deep hole. Mr Biden is up by nine points—more in some polls. He is doing well in battleground states like Florida, Michigan and Wisconsin, and he has strong support among older voters and is doing surprisingly well among white voters who did not go to college. Our model now gives Mr Trump only a roughly 10% chance of winning. The virus has demonstrated something definitively to a large number of persuadable voters: that Mr Trump is just not that good at being a president.

 

Covid-19 is here to stay. People will have to adapt

It is astonishing how rapidly the pandemic has spread, despite all the efforts to stop it. On February 1st, the day covid-19 first appeared on our front cover, the World Health Organisation counted 2,115 new cases. On June 28th its daily tally reached 190,000. That day as many new cases were notched up every 90 minutes as had been recorded in total by February 1st.

 

China’s draconian security law for Hong Kong buries one country, two systems

The chinese government is spreading fear in Hong Kong. The first shock came in May, when it announced plans to impose a sweeping national-security law on the territory, without the say-so of its legislature. Then it drafted the bill behind closed doors, keeping details secret even from Hong Kong’s administration. After the law was passed on June 30th by China’s rubber-stamp parliament, hours passed before it was published at close to midnight. The 18-page bill, which took effect that day, was harsher than the gloomiest analysts had predicted. It is one of the biggest assaults on a liberal society since the second world war (see article).

 

Chinese officials argue that they are doing nothing wrong: national-security laws are common around the world, even in democracies. But that is disingenuous. This one allows China’s Communist Party to rip up its promise of one country, two systems and send its secret agents into Hong Kong to impose order as it pleases. Its spooks will not be subject to local law. Most national-security cases, supposedly, will be tried in Hong Kong’s own courts. But the judges will be government-appointed. They will be allowed to dispense with juries and try cases in secret. Most worrying is that “complex” or “serious” crimes may be tried on the mainland. The past year of unrest in Hong Kong was sparked by fears of just such a possibility—that a now-shelved extradition law might let dissidents be whisked away to face the mainland’s brutal justice. That is what the new law allows. Officials do not rule out that those convicted by mainland courts could be executed.

 

Check out more at: https://www.economist.com/weeklyedition/2020-07-04

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